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Veterinarian Salary – Average Veterinarian Income

Veterinarian Salary – Average Veterinarian Income. Veterinarian commonly known as vet is a professional who treats diseases, disorders and injuries in animals. Veterinarians often need to stay on call at all hours of the day and night, and on weekends and holidays as well. They generally have to work long hours. Many vets work in clinics with small animals like dogs and cats, while they are others who work with large animals like cows and horses and livestock. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics says that almost 80 percent of vets work in private clinics and the average annual salary of a vet as of May 2009 was $80,510, out of which 50 percent were earning from $62,770 to $105,190.

Average Veterinarian Hourly Wage in the United States

Veterinarians earn a median hourly wage of $42.54. Hourly wages typically start from $25.58 and go up to $76.09.

Source: U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics

Average Veterinarian Yearly Salary in the United States

Veterinarians earn a median salary of $88,490 per year. Salaries typically start from $53,210 and go up to $158,260.

Source: U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics

Learn more about the Veterinarian job market for salaries of real jobs in your area.

See also: Dentist Salary – Average Dentist Salary. How Much Does a Dentist Make?

According to the 2011 figures released by the American Veterinary Medicine Association, new veterinarians saw a wide variance in salaries – 40% earned $31,000 or less, while others reported salaries in excess of $90,000 (however 52% of those respondents were in residency or post-graduate programs). When those are removed from the equation, the 48% who’d formally entered practice earned an average of $66,469. Veterinarians pay almost as much for their schooling as medical doctors, but have much less earning power to compensate for their debt load (doctors easily earn two to three times as much).

The type of practice has a great deal to do with a new veterinarian’s income. Roughly three-quarters of all vets in private practice treat pets or companion animals. In 2011, first-year salaries for vets in exclusively pet-oriented practices were $69,789. Exclusively food-animal practices paid $71,096. Equine practices paid the least, at $43,405, while general mixed-animal practices averaged $62,655.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, veterinarians in research facilities were paid the best, at an average income of $124,610, while those working for pharmaceutical companies earned $113,270. Veterinarians in private practice averaged $91,160.

Geographically, the state with the highest average salary for veterinarians was Connecticut, at $125,810. New Jersey, Hawaii, the District of Columbia and Pennsylvania were also among the highest-paid jurisdictions. Montana had the lowest average salary, at $60,590.

Industry

Most vets draw an annual average salary of $90,470 and are termed as part of the professional, scientific and technical services industry. Medical and diagnostic services head the list of the most paying industry with an average salary of $114,590. This is followed by the pharmaceutical and medicine manufacturing industry at $107,200. The lowest tier is the scientific research and development services with an average annual salary of $97,200.

Salary Account to State

State wise in the U.S. the highest paid veterinarians were in New Jersey with an average annual salary of $117,170, Connecticut vets earn $116,150, Florida $05,540, California $99,940 and Carolina $99,630. On the other end of the scale in Colorado the average annual salary of vets is $74,670 and $60,430 in Montana.

Metropolitan Area

State wise in the U.S. the highest paid veterinarians were in New Jersey with an average annual salary of $117,170, Connecticut vets earn $116,150, Florida $05,540, California $99,940 and Carolina $99,630. On the other end of the scale in Colorado the average annual salary of vets is $74,670 and $60,430 in Montana.

Considerations

If you choose to become a veterinarian you must graduate from an accredited college of veterinary medicine and get a state license to start practicing. You will need to compete to get admission in the college. Bureau of Labor Statistics says employment of vets is likely to increase by 33 percent from 2008 to 2018.

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Written by Kadmin

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